The Happiness Bottle Hypothesis

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Every bottle is different.

Every bottle is different.

I’m sure you have experienced a day, or maybe even days, of complete and utter euphoria. After which, that state of excitement immediately sends you into a pit of depression and despair. No, it is not the ‘back to normal’ feel, but rather goes beyond that and completely damages your train of thought. You begin realizing new problems that problems about anything and everything that may or may not concern you at all. Thus, with a hoodie covering your head and black eyeliner beneath your eyes you walk through the halls with a shadow of gloom following your every move. I propose this  phenomenon as The Happiness Bottle Hypothesis.

This hypothesis has several postulates that are observed to be true:

1. The amount of happiness of people experience vary.
The premise is that we all have a bottle of happiness. We get unlimited refills in these bottle, but the size of the bottle depends on several factors like family, friends, school, finances, etc., but the most important factor is perspective. What truly sets apart the amount of happiness your bottle can hold is your perspective. Happiness is a perspective of how you view things that are in your life. Happiness, being subjective, is different from one person to another. Person A may view getting a flat tire as destiny and should just accept that things happen for a reason, while Person B sees it as pure dumb luck. Happiness is just a perspective, so it is up to you to determine the amount of happiness your bottle can possess.

2. Despite that, there is a finite amount of happiness a person can possess in a day.

When you wake up in the morning, someone refills our bottle. There is a specific amount of happiness in that bottle, anything more than that just overflows. Even though the amount of happiness you could possess is indefinite, there is a finite amount of happiness you can use in a day. People who are optimistic and carefree are able to use more happiness in a day (due to having a larger bottle), as opposed to pessimistic people.

Being cheerful THROUGHOUT the day (note: It means evenly spread out through the day) shows you were able to evenly distribute the happiness for that day. If you were happy only in the morning, then you must have used up all of it already.

3. Nonetheless, the happiness of one day can be used by another day.
There are days when you are extremely happy for a long period of time. Maybe you were at a party with some old friends. Maybe you got promoted and celebrated. This happens to most of us. You use up all our happiness and unconsciously use up the next day’s worth as well. It’s like ordering an extra drink without having money to pay so you borrow some from a friend. Eventually you have to pay your dues. Using up more than a bottle’s worth leaves the next day with none to use. You begin feeling depressed. Looking back at that moment when we cared for nothing and had so much fun, you begin thinking of things you might have regret doing. You go back to thinking about your work, you spouse, your friends, even global warming. Such is just the effect of draining the happiness bottle.

4. Oh and yes, you can run out of happiness!
Remember, happiness is a perspective. If you choose to see yourself being miserable for the rest of your life, then it just means you sold your happiness bottle to some dude in a grey suit and tie. But if you just enjoy life consistently, you get unlimited refills!

Thus ends the Happiness Bottle Hypothesis.

Disclaimer: This is just a perspective of mine. I am not imposing my thoughts, just expressing them.

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